Hijama Cupping Therapy-Quirky Facts…

  • In Europe and USA…
  • Doctors were trained and qualified MD’s and practiced cupping which was recognised by the state (In 1512, UK regulated Cupping to Oxford and Cambridge University graduates only). Originally, Cuppers had a high status as they did surgery too. But gradually, their image worsened as they worked with lower classes and did not practice cupping safely. Also, poor people could not afford MD’s, so doctors trained Barbers as apprentices to service the poor. They had different uniforms from doctors. They also expanded the job description in to bathhouse attendants and in saunas/massage. Eventually, King Henry XIII merged Barbers and Doctors associations. The role of the barber was then formalised in to haircutting and grooming, cupping, dental extractions and massage. Female MD’s and Cupping Therapists had a good reputation and were sought after. But by the 13th century, the medical field had been documented, regulated and organised. Women were pushed out of the profession and the art of cupping declined.
  • The barber’s pole came to be a symbol of the legacy of Hijama. The staff was to advertise the Barbers shop andwas decorated withribbons of used linens/bandages. These were white but reddened with blood after treatments. The ball at the top was originally a bowl of leeches. Red symbolised blood, white was the bandages and blue was for the veins.
  • By the 1940’s, Cupping Therapy declined in the USA and Europe as modern medicine and Pharmaceuticals took over the medical field. It was mainly practiced by Barbers.
  • Currently, it is considered an “Eastern, Alternative therapy” and is not very common. Sadly many people do not know about it. Those who are aware of it are cautious of this ancient, “barbaric” ritual. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Share

Subscribe to the Blog

Related Blogs